May 30 in history

May 30 events chronologically

70 Siege of Jerusalem: Titus and his Roman legions breach the Second Wall of Jerusalem. The Jewish defenders retreat to the First Wall. The Romans build a circumvallation, cutting down all trees within fifteen kilometres
1381 Beginning of the Peasants' Revolt in England
1416 The Council of Constance, called by Emperor Sigismund, a supporter of Antipope John XXIII, burns Jerome of Prague following a trial for heresy
1431 Hundred Years' War: in Rouen, France, the 19-year-old Joan of Arc is burned at the stake by an English-dominated tribunal. The Roman Catholic Church remembers this day as the celebration of Saint Joan of Arc
1434 Hussite Wars: Battle of Lipany – effectively ending the war, Utraquist forces led by Diviš Bořek of Miletínek defeat and almost annihilate Taborite forces led by Prokop the Great
1510 During the reign of the Zhengde Emperor, Ming Dynasty rebel leader Zhu Zhifan is defeated by commander Qiu Yue, ending the Prince of Anhua rebellion
1536 King Henry VIII of England marries Jane Seymour, a lady-in-waiting to his first two wives

Top 7 most famous people born on May 30

1814 Mikhail Bakunin a Russian revolutionary anarchist, and founder of collectivist anarchism. He is considered among the most influential figures of anarchism, and one of the principal founders of the "social anarchist" tradition. Bakunin's enormous prestige as an activist made him one of the most famous ideologues in Europe, and he gained substantial influence among radicals throughout Russia and Europe
1896 Howard Hawks an American film director, producer and screenwriter of the classic Hollywood era. He is popular for his films from a wide range of genres such as Scarface , Bringing Up Baby , Only Angels Have Wings , His Girl Friday , Sergeant York , To Have and Have Not , The Big Sleep , Red River , The Thing from Another World , Gentlemen Prefer Blondes , and Rio Bravo
1909 Benny Goodman an American jazz and swing musician, clarinetist and bandleader, known as the "King of Swing".
1964 Tom Morello an American guitarist and activist. He is best known for his tenure with the band Rage Against the Machine and then with Audioslave. Morello is currently a touring musician with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. He is also known for his acoustic solo act called The Nightwatchman, and his latest group Street Sweeper Social Club. Morello is also the co-founder of the non-profit political activist organization Axis of Justice, which airs a monthly program on Pacifica Radio station KPFK in Los Angeles
1972 Manny Ramirez a Dominican-American professional baseball outfielder who played in Major League Baseball and the Chinese Professional Baseball League. He hit his first home run in his return as a player coach in the first home game he played in for the Iowa Cubs. He played in Major League Baseball with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago White Sox, and Tampa Bay Rays. Ramirez is recognized for great batting skill and power. He was a nine-time Silver Slugger and was one of 25 players to hit 500 career home runs. His 21 grand slams are third all-time, and his 29 postseason home runs are the most in big league history. He appeared in 12 All-Star Games, with a streak of eleven consecutive games beginning in 1998 that included every season that he played with the Red Sox
1974 CeeLo Green an American singer-songwriter, as well as a record producer, rapper, actor and businessman.
1980 Steven Gerrard an English footballer who plays for and captains Premier League club Liverpool. He has played much of his career as a central midfielder, but he has also been used as a second striker, holding midfielder, attacking midfielder, right back and right winger

Top 7 most famous people died on May 30

1431 Joan of Arc considered a heroine of France and a Roman Catholic saint. She was born to a peasant family at Domrémy in north-east France. Joan said she received visions of the Archangel Michael, Saint Margaret and Saint Catherine instructing her to support Charles VII and recover France from English domination late in the Hundred Years' War. The uncrowned King Charles VII sent Joan to the siege of Orléans as part of a relief mission. She gained prominence after the siege was lifted in only nine days. Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII's coronation at Reims. On 23 May 1430, she was captured at Compiègne by the allied English-Burgundian faction. She was later handed over to the English, and then put on trial by the pro-English Bishop of Beauvais Pierre Cauchon on a variety of charges. After Cauchon declared her guilty she was burned at the stake on 30 May 1431, dying at about nineteen years of age
1593 Christopher Marlowe an English dramatist, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era. Marlowe was the foremost Elizabethan tragedian of his day. He greatly influenced William Shakespeare, who was born in the same year as Marlowe and who rose to become the pre-eminent Elizabethan playwright after Marlowe's mysterious early death. Marlowe's plays are known for the use of blank verse, and their overreaching protagonists
1640 Peter Paul Rubens a Flemish Baroque painter, and a proponent of an extravagant Baroque style that emphasized movement, colour, and sensuality. He is well known for his Counter-Reformation altarpieces, portraits, landscapes, and history paintings of mythological and allegorical subjects
1744 Alexander Pope an 18th-century English poet, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the third-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare and Tennyson
1778 Voltaire a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of expression, and separation of church and state. Voltaire was a versatile writer, producing works in almost every literary form, including plays, poems, novels, essays, and historical and scientific works. He wrote more than 20,000 letters and more than 2,000 books and pamphlets. He was an outspoken advocate, despite the risk this placed him in under the strict censorship laws of the time. As a satirical polemicist, he frequently made use of his works to criticize intolerance, religious dogma, and the French institutions of his day
1960 Boris Pasternak a Russian poet, novelist, and literary translator. In his native Russia, Pasternak's first book of poems, My Sister, Life , is one of the most influential collections ever published in the Russian language. Pasternak's translations of stage plays by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, and William Shakespeare remain very popular with Russian audiences
1961 Rafael Trujillo a Dominican politician and soldier who ruled the Dominican Republic from February 1930 until his assassination in May 1961. He officially served as president from 1930 to 1938 and again from 1942 to 1952, ruling for the rest of the time as an unelected military strongman under figurehead presidents. His 31 years in power, to Dominicans known as the Trujillo Era , is considered one of the bloodiest eras ever in the Americas, as well as a time of a classic personality cult, when monuments to Trujillo were in abundance. It has been estimated that Trujillo's tyrannical rule was responsible for the death of more than 50,000 people, including possibly as many as 25,000 in the infamous Parsley Massacre