Died in May

May 25, 9 Julius Nepos Western Roman Emperor de facto from 474 to 475 and de jure until 480. He was also the ruler of Roman Dalmatia from 468 to 480. Some historians consider Nepos to be the last Western Roman Emperor, while others consider the western line to have ended with Romulus Augustulus in 476. In contrast, the Eastern Roman Empire and its line of Emperors survived this period of history essentially intact
May 13, 189 Emperor Ling of Han an emperor of the Chinese Han dynasty. He was a great-great-grandson of Emperor Zhang. The Yellow Turban Rebellion broke out during Emperor Ling's reign
May 22, 192 Dong Zhuo a politician and warlord who lived in the late Eastern Han Dynasty. He seized control of the capital Luoyang in 189 when it was in a state of turmoil following the death of Emperor Ling and a clash between the eunuch faction and some court officials led by General-in-Chief He Jin. Dong Zhuo subsequently deposed Emperor Shao and instated Emperor Xian
May 23, 230 Pope Urban I Bishop of Rome or pope from 222 to 23 May 230. He was born in Rome and succeeded Pope Callixtus I, who had been martyred. It was previously believed for centuries that Urban I was also martyred. However, recent historical discoveries now lead scholars to believe that he died of natural causes
May 17, 290 Emperor Wu of Jin the grandson of Sima Yi and son of Sima Zhao. He became the first emperor of the Jin dynasty after forcing Cao Huan, last ruler of the state of Cao Wei, to abdicate to him. He reigned from 265 to 290, and after conquering the state of Eastern Wu in 280, was the emperor of a unified China. Emperor Wu was known for his extravagance and sensuality, especially after the unification of China; legends boasted of his incredible potency among ten thousand concubines
May 22, 337 Constantine the Great Roman Emperor from 306 to 337. Constantine was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman army officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west in 293. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under the emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius was raised to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia. Acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eburacum after his father's death in 306, Constantine emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against the emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324
May 9, 348 Pachomius the Great generally recognized as the founder of Christian cenobitic monasticism. Coptic churches celebrate his feast day on 9 May, and Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches mark his feast on 15 May. In the Lutheran Church, the saint is remembered as a renewer of the church, along with his contemporary , Anthony of Egypt on January 17
May 27, 366 Procopius (usurper) a Roman usurper against Valens, and member of the Constantinian dynasty.
May 3, 369 Juvenal of Narni venerated as the first Bishop of Narni in Umbria. Historical details regarding Juvenal’s life are limited. A biography of Juvenal of little historical value was written after the seventh century; it states that Juvenal was born in Africa and was ordained by Pope Damasus I and was the first bishop of Narni and was buried in the Porta Superiore on the Via Flaminia on August 7, though his feast day was celebrated on May 3. This Vita does not call him a martyr but calls him a confessor. The martyrologies of Florus of Lyon and Ado describe Juvenal as a bishop and confessor rather than as a martyr
May 2, 373 Athanasius of Alexandria the twentieth bishop of Alexandria. His episcopate lasted 45 years , of which over 17 were spent in five exiles ordered by four different Roman emperors. Athanasius is a renowned Christian theologian, a Church Father, the chief defender of Trinitarianism against Arianism, and a noted Egyptian leader of the fourth century
May 15, 392 Valentinian II Roman Emperor from AD 375 to 392.
May 1, 408 Arcadius Eastern Roman Emperor from 395 to 408. He was the eldest son of Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Western Emperor Honorius. A weak ruler, his reign was dominated by a series of powerful ministers and by his wife, Aelia Eudoxia
May 1, 418 Saint Amator bishop of Auxerre from 388 until his death on May 1, 418. Saint Amator's feast day is celebrated on May 1
May 31, 455 Petronius Maximus Western Roman Emperor for two and a half months in 455. A wealthy senator and a prominent aristocrat, he was instrumental in the murders of the Western Roman magister militum, Flavius Aëtius, and the Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III. Maximus was killed during the events culminating in the sack of Rome by the Vandals in 455
May 5, 465 Gerontius (bishop of Milan) Archbishop of Milan from 462 to 465. He is honoured as a Saint in the Catholic Church and his feast day is 5 May
May 22, 516 Pope John II (III) of Alexandria 30th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark.
May 18, 526 Pope John I Pope from 13 August 523 to his death in 526. He was a native of Siena , near Chiusdino, in Italy. He is the first pope known to have visited Constantinople while in office
May 8, 535 Pope John II Pope from 2 January 533 to his death in 535.
May 13, 558 John the Silent a Christian saint known for living alone for seventy-six years. He was given the surname because he loved recollection and silence. John's feast day is May 13 in the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, and December 3 in the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches
May 15, 558 Hilary of Galeata venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. His feast day is May 15
May 28, 576 Germain of Paris a bishop of Paris, who was canonized in 754. He is known in his early vita as pater et pastor populi, rendered in modern times as the "Father of the Poor"
May 26, 604 Augustine of Canterbury a Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the English Church
May 25, 615 Pope Boniface IV Pope from 25 September 608 to his death in 615. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church
May 14, 649 Pope Theodore I Pope from 24 November 642 to his death in 649. Although considered a Greek, he was born in Jerusalem. He was made a cardinal deacon and a full cardinal by Pope John IV
May 25, 675 Li Hong a crown prince of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty. He was the fifth son of Emperor Gaozong and the oldest son of his second wife Empress Wu , and he was made the crown prince in 656. As he grew older, he often came in conflict with his ambitious mother Empress Wu, and it is commonly believed by traditional historians that she poisoned him to death in 675. His father Emperor Gaozong, then still reigning, posthumously honored him with an imperial title
May 1, 680 Muawiyah I the second caliph from the Umayyad clan, the first being Uthman ibn Affan. Muawiyah was politically adept in dealing with the Eastern Roman Empire and was therefore made into a secretary by Muhammad. During the first and second caliphates of Abu Bakr and Umar , he fought with the Muslims against the Byzantines in Syria
May 7, 685 Marwan I the fourth Umayyad Caliph, and the cousin of Uthman ibn Affan, who took over the dynasty after Muawiya II abdicated in 684. Marwan's ascension pointed to a shift in the lineage of the Umayyad dynasty from descendants of Abu Sufyan to those of Hakam , both of whom were grandsons of Umayya. Hakam was also the uncle of Uthman ibn Affan
May 8, 685 Pope Benedict II Pope from 26 June 684 to his death in 685.
May 20, 685 Ecgfrith of Northumbria the King of Deira from 664 until 670, and then King of Northumbria from 670 until his death, succeeding his father Oswiu. He ruled over Northumbria when it was at the height of its power, but his reign ended with a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Nechtansmere in which he lost his life
May 10, 689 Prince Kusakabe a Japanese imperial crown prince from 681 until his death. He was the second son of Emperor Temmu. His mother was the empress Unonosarara, today known as Empress Jitō
May 25, 709 Aldhelm born before the middle of the 7th century. He is said to have been the son of Kenten, who was of the royal house of Wessex. He was certainly not, as his early biographer Faritius asserts, the brother of King Ine. After his death he was venerated as a saint, his feast day being the day of his death, 25 May
May 26, 735 Bede an English monk at the monastery of Saint Peter at Monkwearmouth and its companion monastery, Saint Paul's, in modern Jarrow , Northeast England, both of which were located in the Kingdom of Northumbria. He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum gained him the title "The Father of English History"
May 22, 748 Empress Genshō the 44th monarch of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
May 3, 762 Emperor Xuanzong of Tang the seventh emperor of the Tang dynasty in China, reigning from 712 to 756. His reign of 43 years was the longest during the Tang Dynasty. In the early half of his reign he was a diligent and astute ruler, ably assisted by capable chancellors like Yao Chong and Song Jing, and was credited with bringing Tang China to a pinnacle of culture and power
May 13, 772 Dōkyō a Japanese monk of the Hossō sect of Buddhism; and he was a political figure in the Nara period.
May 23, 779 Emperor Daizong of Tang an emperor of the Chinese Tang Dynasty.
May 4, 784 Arbeo of Freising an early medieval author and Bishop of Freising from 764.
May 20, 794 Æthelberht II of East Anglia an eighth-century saint and a king of East Anglia, the Anglo-Saxon kingdom which today includes the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. Little is known of his reign, which may have begun in 779, according to later sources, and very few of the coins issued during his reign have been discovered. It is known from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle that he was killed on the orders of Offa of Mercia in 794
May 19, 804 Alcuin an English scholar, ecclesiastic, poet and teacher from York, Northumbria. He was born around 735 and became the student of Archbishop Ecgbert at York. At the invitation of Charlemagne, he became a leading scholar and teacher at the Carolingian court, where he remained a figure in the 780s and 790s. He wrote many theological and dogmatic treatises, as well as a few grammatical works and a number of poems. He was made Abbot of Tours in 796, where he remained until his death. "The most learned man anywhere to be found", according to Einhard's Life of Charlemagne, he is considered among the most important architects of the Carolingian Renaissance. Among his pupils were many of the dominant intellectuals of the Carolingian era
May 12, 805 Æthelhard a Bishop of Winchester then an Archbishop of Canterbury in medieval England. Appointed by King Offa of Mercia, Æthelhard had difficulties with both the Kentish monarchs and with a rival archiepiscopate in southern England, and was deposed around 796 by King Eadberht III Præn of Kent. By 803, Æthelhard, along with the Mercian King Coenwulf, had secured the demotion of the rival archbishopric, once more making Canterbury the only archbishopric south of the Humber in Britain. Æthelhard died in 805, and was considered a saint until his cult was suppressed after the Norman Conquest in 1066
May 28, 812 William of Gellone the second Count of Toulouse from 790 until his replacement in 811. His Occitan name is Guilhem, and he is known in French as Guillaume d'Orange, Guillaume Fierabrace, and the Marquis au court nez. William was canonized a saint on 1066 by Pope Alexander II
May 26, 819 Ali al-Ridha the seventh descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the eighth of the Twelve Imams, according to the Twelver Shia sect of Islam as well as an Imam of knowledge according to the Zaydi Shia school and Sufis. His given name was 'Alī ibn Mūsā ibn Ja'far
May 21, 822 Al-Hakam I Umayyad Emir of Cordoba from 796 until 822 in the Al-Andalus.
May 6, 850 Emperor Ninmyō the 54th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Ninmyō's reign lasted from 833 to 850
May 27, 866 Ordoño I of Asturias King of Asturias from 850 until his death.
May 15, 884 Pope Marinus I Pope from 16 December 882 to his death in 884. He succeeded John VIII in about the end of December 882
May 3, 886 Wulgrin I of Angoulême the Count of Angoulême, Périgueux, and possible Saintonge from 866 to his death. His parents were Vulfard , Count of Flavigny, and Suzanne, who was a daughter of the Bego I, Count of Paris. His brother Hilduin the Young was the abbot of Saint-Denis. Ademar of Chabannes is the chief source on his active reign in preserving and moulding Angoulême
May 18, 893 Stephen I of Constantinople the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 886 to 893.
May 2, 907 Boris I of Bulgaria the Knyaz of the First Bulgarian Empire in 852–889. At the time of his baptism in 864, Boris was named Michael after his godfather, Emperor Michael III. The historian Steven Runciman called him one of the greatest persons in history
May 11, 912 Leo VI the Wise Byzantine Emperor from 886 to 912. The second ruler of the Macedonian dynasty , he was very well-read, leading to his surname. During his reign, the renaissance of letters, begun by his predecessor Basil I, continued; but the Empire also saw several military defeats in the Balkans against Bulgaria and against the Arabs in Sicily and the Aegean