Died on November 17

344 Emperor Kang of Jin an emperor of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. He was a son of Emperor Ming and younger brother of Emperor Cheng. His reign was brief—only two years
375 Valentinian I Roman emperor from 364 to 375. Upon becoming emperor he made his brother Valens his co-emperor, giving him rule of the eastern provinces while Valentinian retained the west
474 Leo II (emperor) Byzantine Emperor for less than a year in 474. He was the son of Zeno and Ariadne, and maternal grandson of Leo I and Verina. As Leo's closest male relative, he was named successor upon his grandfather's death. After taking his father as colleague, he died of an unknown disease about 10 months into his reign in November, 474. It was widely rumored that he might have been poisoned by his mother Ariadne in order to bring her husband Zeno to the throne. He was indeed succeeded by his father, although his grandmother Verina took advantage of his death to conspire against Zeno
593 Gregory of Tours a Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of Gaul. He was born Georgius Florentius, later adding the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather. He wrote in a form of late Vulgar Latin; however, it has been argued that this was a deliberate ploy to ensure his works would reach a wide audience. He is the main contemporary source for Merovingian history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum or Ten Books of Histories, better known as the Historia Francorum , a title given to it by later chroniclers, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of Martin of Tours. St Martin's tomb was a major draw in the 6th century, and Gregory's writings had the practical aspect of promoting this highly organized devotion
641 Emperor Jomei the 34th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
885 Liutgard of Saxony the wife and Queen of Louis the Younger, the Frankish King of Saxony and East Francia.
1104 Nikephoros Melissenos a Byzantine general and aristocrat. Of distinguished lineage, he served as a governor and general in the Balkans and Asia Minor in the 1060s. In the turbulent period after the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, when several generals tried to seize the throne for themselves, Melissenos remained loyal to Michael VII Doukas and was exiled by his successor Nikephoros III Botaneiates. In 1080–1081, with Turkish aid, he seized control of what remained of Byzantine Asia Minor and proclaimed himself emperor against Botaneiates. After the revolt of his brother-in-law Alexios I Komnenos, however, which succeeded in taking Constantinople, he submitted to him, accepting the rank of Caesar and the governance of Thessalonica. He remained loyal to Alexios thereafter, participating in most Byzantine campaigns of the period 1081–1095 in the Balkans at the emperor's side. He died on 17 November 1104
1188 Usama ibn Munqidh a medieval Muslim poet, author, faris , and diplomat from the Banu Munqidh dynasty of Shaizar in northern Syria. His life coincided with the rise of several medieval Muslim dynasties, the arrival of the First Crusade, and the establishment of the crusader states
1231 Elizabeth of Hungary a princess of the Kingdom of Hungary, Landgravine of Thuringia, Germany and a greatly venerated Catholic saint. Elizabeth was married at the age of 14, and widowed at 20. After her husband's death she sent her children away and regained her dowry, using the money to build a hospital where she herself served the sick. She became a symbol of Christian charity after her death at the age of 24 and was quickly canonized
1307 Hethum II King of Armenia king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1289 to 1293, 1295 to 1296 and 1299 to 1303, while Armenia was a subject state of the Mongol Empire. He abdicated twice in order to take vows in the Franciscan order, while still remaining the power behind the throne as "Grand Baron of Armenia" and later as Regent for his nephew. He was the son of Leo II of Armenia and Kyranna de Lampron, and was part of the Hethumid dynasty, being the grandson of Hethum I, who had originally submitted Cilicia to the Mongols in 1247. He was assassinated with his nephew and successor Leo III by the Mongol general Bilarghu, who himself was later executed for this by the Mongol Ilkhan ruler Öljaitü
1326 Edmund FitzAlan 9th Earl of Arundel an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died 09/03/1301 while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded
1417 Gazi Evrenos an Ottoman military commander, with an unlikely long-lived career and lifetime. He served as general under Süleyman Pasha, Murad I, Bayezid I, Süleyman Çelebi and Mehmed I
1494 Giovanni Pico della Mirandola an Italian Renaissance philosopher. He is famed for the events of 1486, when at the age of 23, he proposed to defend 900 theses on religion, philosophy, natural philosophy and magic against all comers, for which he wrote the famous Oration on the Dignity of Man, which has been called the "Manifesto of the Renaissance", and a key text of Renaissance humanism and of what has been called the "Hermetic Reformation"
1524 Wenceslaus II Duke of Cieszyn a Duke of Cieszyn since 1518 until his death.
1525 Eleanor of Viseu a Portuguese infanta and later queen consort of Portugal.
1528 Jakob Wimpfeling a Renaissance humanist and theologian.
1532 Tullio Lombardo an Italian Renaissance sculptor. He was the brother of Antonio Lombardo and son of Pietro Lombardo. The Lombardo family worked together to sculpt famous Catholic churches and tombs. The church of Santi Giovanni e Paolo contains the Monument to Doge Pietro Mocenigo, executed with his father and brother, and the Monument to Doge Andrea Vendramin, an evocation of a Roman triumphal arch encrusted with decorative figures. Tullio also likely completed the funereal monument to Marco Cornaro in the Church of Santi Apostoli and the frieze in the Cornaro Chapel of the Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari. He also participated in the work to decorate Santa Maria dei Miracoli, Venice
1558 Reginald Pole an English cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and the last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury, holding the office during the Counter Reformation.
1558 Mary I of England Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. Her executions of Protestants caused her opponents to give her the sobriquet "Bloody Mary"
1562 Antoine of Navarre the King of Navarre through his marriage to Queen Jeanne III, from 1555 until his death. He was the first monarch of the House of Bourbon, of which he was head from 1537. He was the father of Henry IV of France
1566 Annibale Caro an Italian writer and poet.
1592 John III of Sweden King of Sweden from 1568 until his death. He was the son of King Gustav I of Sweden and his second wife Margaret Leijonhufvud. He was also, quite autonomously, the ruler of Finland, as Duke John from 1556 to 1563. In 1581 he assumed also the title Grand Prince of Finland
1600 Kuki Yoshitaka a naval commander during Japan's Sengoku Period, under Oda Nobunaga, and later, Toyotomi Hideyoshi. He was also the ninth headmaster of the Kuki family's school of martial arts, Kukishin-ryū and thus a very skilled warrior
1624 Jakob Böhme a German Christian mystic and theologian. He is considered an original thinker within the Lutheran tradition, and his first book, commonly known as Aurora, caused a great scandal. In contemporary English, his name may be spelled Jacob Boehme; in seventeenth-century England it was also spelled Behmen, approximating the contemporary English pronunciation of the German Böhme
1632 Gottfried Heinrich Graf zu Pappenheim a field marshal of the Holy Roman Empire in the Thirty Years' War.
1634 Giordano Ansaloni an Italian Dominican missionary in Asia. He is a Catholic martyr, beatified in 1981 and canonized in 1987 by Pope John Paul II
1643 Jean-Baptiste Budes Comte de Guébriant marshal of France.
1648 Thomas Ford (composer) an English composer, lutenist, viol player and poet.
1664 Nicolas Perrot d'Ablancourt a French translator of the Greek and Latin classics into French and a member of the Académie française.
1665 John Earle (bishop) an English bishop.
1668 Joseph Alleine an English Nonconformist pastor and author of many religious works.
1673 Jacob van der Does a Dutch Golden Age landscape painter.
1681 Tito Livio Burattini an inventor, architect, Egyptologist, scientist, instrument-maker, traveller, engineer, and nobleman. He was born in Agordo, Italy, and studied in Padua and Venice. In 1639, he explored the Great Pyramid of Giza with English mathematician John Greaves; both Burattini and Sir Isaac Newton used measurements made by Greaves in an attempt to accurately determine the circumference of the earth
1690 Charles de Sainte-Maure duc de Montausier a French soldier and the governor of the dauphin, Louis le Grand Dauphin, the eldest son and heir of Louis XIV, King of France.
1708 Ludolf Bakhuizen a German-born Dutch Golden Age painter who was the leading Dutch painter of maritime subjects after the two Willem van de Veldes left for England in 1672.
1713 Abraham van Riebeeck a Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies. He was born in the Cape Colony in South Africa, and was the son of Jan van Riebeeck. One of Abraham's children was Johanna Maria van Riebeeck , who had married his predecessor Governor-General, Joan van Hoorn. After he finished his studies in the Netherlands in 1676, he entered the Dutch East India Company as a merchant
1739 Marie Amalie of Brandenburg a princess from the Brandenburg-Schwedt line of the House of Hohenzollern and by marriage a Duchess of Saxe-Zeitz.
1747 Alain-René Lesage a French novelist and playwright. Lesage is best known for his comic novel The Devil upon Two Sticks , his comedy Turcaret , and his picaresque novel Gil Blas
1757 Maria Josepha of Austria born an Archduchess of Austria, and from 1711 to 1713 was heiress presumptive to the Habsburg Empire. By her marriage to Augustus of Saxony she was the Electress of Saxony and Queen consort of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
1768 Thomas Pelham-Holles 1st Duke of Newcastle a British Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. He is commonly known as the Duke of Newcastle
1770 Gian Francesco de Majo an Italian composer. He is chiefly known for his more than 20 operas. He also composed a considerable amount of sacred works, including oratorios, cantatas, and masses
1773 Laurent Angliviel de la Beaumelle a French Protestant writer.
1776 James Ferguson (Scottish astronomer) a Scottish astronomer, instrument and globe maker.
1781 Bernard-Joseph Saurin a lawyer, poet, and playwright.
1796 Catherine the Great the most renowned and the longest-ruling female leader of Russia, reigning from 9 July 1762 until her death in 1796 at the age of 67. Her reign was called Russia's golden age. She was born in Stettin, Pomerania, Prussia as Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg, and came to power following a coup d'état and the assassination of her husband, Peter III, at the end of the Seven Years' War. Russia was revitalized under her reign, growing larger and stronger than ever and becoming recognized as one of the great powers of Europe
1808 David Zeisberger a Moravian clergyman and missionary among the Native Americans in the Thirteen Colonies. He established communities of Munsee converts in the valley of the Muskingum River in Ohio; and for a time, near modern-day Amherstburg, Ontario
1813 Louis comte de Narbonne-Lara a French nobleman, soldier and diplomat.
1816 Dorothea Viehmann a German storyteller. Her stories were an important source for the fairy tales collected by the Brothers Grimm. Most of Dorothea Viehmann's tales were published in the second volume of Grimms' Fairy Tales
1818 Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz the wife of King George III. She was Queen of Great Britain and Ireland from their marriage until the union of the two kingdoms in 1801, after which she was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until her death in 1818. She was also the Electress of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire until the promotion of her husband to King of Hanover on 12 October 1814, after which she was also queen consort of Hanover
1822 Joaquim Machado de Castro one of Portugal's foremost sculptors. He wrote extensively on his works and the theory behind them, including a full-length discussion of the statue of José I entitled Descripção analytica da execucão da estatua equestre, Lisbon 1810