November 18 in history

November 18 events chronologically

326 The old St. Peter's Basilica is consecrated
401 The Visigoths, led by king Alaric I, cross the Alps and invade northern Italy
1105 Maginulfo is elected the Antipope as Sylvester IV
1180 Phillip II becomes king of France
1210 Pope Innocent III excommunicates Holy Roman Emperor Otto IV
1302 Pope Boniface VIII issues the Papal bull Unam sanctam (One Faith)
1307 William Tell shoots an apple off his son's head

Top 7 most famous people born on November 18

1836 W. S. Gilbert an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. The most famous of these include H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and one of the most frequently performed works in the history of musical theatre, The Mikado. These, as well as several of the other Savoy operas, continue to be frequently performed in the English-speaking world and beyond by opera companies, repertory companies, schools and community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "short, sharp shock", "What, never? Well, hardly ever!", and "Let the punishment fit the crime"
1923 Alan Shepard an American naval officer and aviator, test pilot, flag officer, one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts, and businessman, who in 1961 became the second person and the first American to travel into space. This Mercury flight was designed to enter space, but not to achieve orbit. Ten years later, at age 47 and the oldest astronaut in the program, Shepard commanded the Apollo 14 mission, piloting the lander to the most accurate landing of the Apollo missions. He became the fifth and oldest person to walk on the Moon, and the only astronaut of the Mercury Seven to walk on the Moon. During the mission, he hit two golf balls on the lunar surface
1923 Ted Stevens a United States Senator from Alaska, whose tenure extended from December 24, 1968, until January 3, 2009. He was thus the longest-serving Republican senator in history. He was President pro tempore in the 108th and 109th Congresses from January 3, 2003, to January 3, 2007, and the third senator to hold the title of President pro tempore emeritus
1939 Margaret Atwood a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, and environmental activist. She is a winner of the Arthur Clarke Award and Prince of Asturias Award for Literature, has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize five times, winning once, and has been a finalist for the Governor General's Award several times, winning twice. In 2001 she was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame. She is also a founder of the Writers' Trust of Canada, a non-profit literary organization that seeks to encourage Canada's writing community. Among innumerable contributions to Canadian literature, she was a founding trustee of the Griffin Poetry Prize
1945 Mahinda Rajapaksa the 6th President of Sri Lanka and Commander in Chief of the Sri Lankan Armed Forces. A lawyer by profession, Rajapaksa was first elected to the Parliament of Sri Lanka in 1970, and served as Prime Minister from 6 April 2004 until his victory in the 2005 Presidential election. He was sworn in for a six-year term as president on 19 November 2005. He was re-elected for a second term in office on 27 January 2010
1953 Alan Moore an English writer primarily known for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell. Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in history, he has been called "one of the most important British writers of the last fifty years". He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon and The Original Writer
1974 Chloë Sevigny an American actress, fashion designer, and former model. She gained a reputation for her eclectic fashion sense, and developed a broad career in the fashion industry in the mid-to-late 1990s for modeling and her intern work at New York's Sassy Magazine, which labeled her the new "It Girl" at the time and garnered her attention within the New York fashion scene. In 1994, her personal style attracted the attention of journalist Jay McInerney, who wrote a 7-page article about her for The New Yorker, in which he called a then 19-year-old Sevigny the "coolest girl in the world". Throughout her early film career, her fashion choices often overshadowed her acting career until her work in 1999's Boys Don't Cry brought her widespread acclaim. In 2000, she won the VH1 Vogue Fashion Award for best female celebrity style. The following year, Vogue Magazine called her a "fashion icon", helping to further accredit her image as one of the coolest women in the industry

Top 7 most famous people died on November 18

1886 Chester A. Arthur the 21st President of the United States ; he succeeded James Garfield upon the latter's assassination. At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome his reputation, stemming from his beginnings in politics as a politician from the New York City Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration
1922 Marcel Proust a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu , published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. He is considered by many to be one of the greatest authors of all time
1962 Niels Bohr a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. Bohr was also a philosopher and a promoter of scientific research
1965 Henry A. Wallace the 33rd Vice President of the United States , the Secretary of Agriculture , and the Secretary of Commerce. In the 1948 presidential election, Wallace was the nominee of the Progressive Party
1976 Man Ray an American visual artist who spent most of his career in France. He was a significant contributor to the Dada and Surrealist movements, although his ties to each were informal. He produced major works in a variety of media but considered himself a painter above all. He was best known for his photography, and he was a renowned fashion and portrait photographer. Ray is also noted for his work with photograms, which he called "rayographs" in reference to himself
1978 Jim Jones an American sect leader and community organizer. Jones was the founder and the leader of the Peoples Temple, best known for the mass suicide in November 1978 of 913 of its members in Jonestown, Guyana, and the murder of five individuals at a nearby airstrip, including Congressman Leo Ryan. Over 300 children were murdered at Jonestown, almost all of them by cyanide poisoning. Jones died from a gunshot wound to the head; it is suspected his death was a suicide
2002 James Coburn an American actor. He was featured in over 70 films and made 100 television appearances during his 45-year career, winning an Academy Award for his supporting role as Glen Whitehouse in Affliction