November 25 in history

November 25 events chronologically

1034 Máel Coluim mac Cináeda, King of Scots, dies. Donnchad, the son of his daughter Bethóc and Crínán of Dunkeld, inherits the throne
1120 The White Ship sinks in the English Channel, drowning William Adelin, son and heir of Henry I of England
1177 Baldwin IV of Jerusalem and Raynald of Châtillon defeat Saladin at the Battle of Montgisard
1343 A tsunami, caused by an earthquake in the Tyrrhenian Sea, devastates Naples (Italy) and the Maritime Republic of Amalfi, among other places
1487 Elizabeth of York is crowned Queen of England
1491 The siege of Granada, the last Moorish stronghold in Spain, ends with the Treaty of Granada
1667 A deadly earthquake rocks Shemakha in the Caucasus, killing 80,000 people

Top 7 most famous people born on November 25

1835 Andrew Carnegie a Scottish American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He was also one of the highest profile philanthropists of his era and had given away almost 90 percent – amounting to, in 1919, $350 million – of his fortune to charities and foundations by the time of his death. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy
1844 Karl Benz a German engine designer and car engineer, generally regarded as the inventor of the first automobile powered by an internal combustion engine, and together with Bertha Benz, pioneering founder of the automobile manufacturer Mercedes-Benz. Other German contemporaries, Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach working as partners, also worked on similar types of inventions, without knowledge of the work of the other, but Benz received a patent for his work first, and, subsequently patented all the processes that made the internal combustion engine feasible for use in an automobile. In 1879, his first engine patent was granted to him, and in 1886, Benz was granted a patent for his first automobile
1881 Pope John XXIII born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli , reigned from 28 October 1958 to his death in 1963, canonised in 2014 and known to Catholics as Pope Saint John XXIII.
1915 Augusto Pinochet dictator of Chile between 1973 and 1990 and Commander-in-Chief of the Chilean Army from 1973 to 1998. He was also president of the Government Junta of Chile between 1973 and 1981
1952 Imran Khan a Pakistani politician and former cricketer. He played international cricket for two decades in the late twentieth century and, after retiring, entered politics. Besides his political activism, Khan is also a philanthropist, cricket commentator, chancellor of the University of Bradford and founding chairman of the Board of Governors of Shaukat Khanum Hospital. He also founded Namal College, Mianwali in 2008
1960 John F. Kennedy Jr. an American lawyer, journalist, and magazine publisher. He was the surviving son of U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, and younger brother of Caroline Kennedy. He was a nephew of Senators Robert Kennedy and Ted Kennedy, who both served as father figures to him after his father's assassination just before his third birthday
1981 Xabi Alonso a Spanish footballer who plays for German club Bayern Munich as a central midfielder.

Top 7 most famous people died on November 25

1944 Kenesaw Mountain Landis an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922 and as the first Commissioner of Baseball from 1920 until his death. He is remembered for his handling of the Black Sox scandal, in which he expelled eight members of the Chicago White Sox from organized baseball for conspiring to lose the 1919 World Series and repeatedly refused their reinstatement requests. His firm actions and iron rule over baseball in the near quarter-century of his commissionership are generally credited with restoring public confidence in the game
1968 Upton Sinclair an American author who wrote nearly 100 books in many genres. He achieved popularity in the first half of the twentieth century, acquiring particular fame for his classic muckraking novel, The Jungle. It exposed conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act. In 1919, he published The Brass Check, a muckraking exposé of American journalism that publicized the issue of yellow journalism and the limitations of the “free press” in the United States. Four years after publication of The Brass Check, the first code of ethics for journalists was created. Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence." In 1943, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
1970 Yukio Mishima the pen name of Kimitake Hiraoka , a Japanese author, poet, playwright, actor, and film director. Mishima is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century; he was nominated three times for the Nobel Prize in Literature and was poised to win the prize in 1968 but lost the award to his fellow countryman Yasunari Kawabata, presumably because of his radical right-wing activities. His avant-garde work displayed a blending of modern and traditional aesthetics that broke cultural boundaries, with a focus on sexuality, death, and political change. He is remembered for his ritual suicide by seppuku after a failed coup d'état attempt, known as the "Mishima Incident"
1974 U Thant a Burmese marvelous diplomat and the third Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1961 to 1971.
1974 Nick Drake an English singer-songwriter and musician, known for his acoustic guitar-based songs. He failed to find a wide audience during his lifetime but his work has gradually achieved wider notice and recognition. Drake signed to Island Records when he was 20 years old and a student at the University of Cambridge, and released his debut album, Five Leaves Left, in 1969. By 1972, he had recorded two more albums—Bryter Layter and Pink Moon. Neither sold more than 5,000 copies on initial release. Drake's reluctance to perform live, or be interviewed, contributed to his lack of commercial success. There is no known footage of the adult Drake; he was only ever captured in still photographs and in home footage from his childhood
1997 Hastings Banda the leader of Malawi and its predecessor state, Nyasaland, from 1961 to 1994. After receiving much of his education overseas, Banda returned to his home country to speak against colonialism and advocate for independence. In 1963, he was formally appointed prime minister of Nyasaland and led the country to independence as Malawi a year later. Two years later, he proclaimed Malawi a republic with himself as president. He consolidated power and later declared Malawi a one-party state under the Malawi Congress Party. In 1970, the MCP made him the party's President for Life. In 1971, he became President for Life of Malawi itself
2005 George Best a Northern Irish footballer who played as a winger for Manchester United and the Northern Ireland national team. In 1968 he won the European Cup with United, and was named the European Footballer of the Year and FWA Footballer of the Year. He is described by the Irish Football Association as the "greatest player to ever pull on the green shirt of Northern Ireland"