November 27 in history

November 27 events chronologically

25 Luoyang is declared capital of the Eastern Han dynasty by Emperor Guangwu of Han
176 Emperor Marcus Aurelius grants his son Commodus the rank of "Imperator" and makes him Supreme Commander of the Roman legions
395 Rufinus, praetorian prefect of the East, is murdered by Gothic mercenaries under Gainas
511 King Clovis I dies at Paris ("Lutetia") and is buried in the Abbey of St Genevieve. The Merovingian dynasty is continued by his four sons, Theuderic I, Chlodomer, Childebert I and Chlothar I, who divide the Frankish Kingdom and rule from the capitals at Metz, Orléans, Paris and Soissons
602 Emperor Maurice is forced to watch his five sons be executed before being beheaded himself; their bodies are thrown into the sea and their heads are exhibited in Constantinople
1095 Pope Urban II declares the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont
1703 The first Eddystone Lighthouse is destroyed in the Great Storm of 1703

Top 7 most famous people born on November 27

1701 Anders Celsius a Swedish astronomer, physicist and mathematician. He was professor of astronomy at Uppsala University from 1730 to 1744, but traveled from 1732 to 1735 visiting notable observatories in Germany, Italy and France. He founded the Uppsala Astronomical Observatory in 1741, and in 1742 proposed the Celsius temperature scale which bears his name
1940 Bruce Lee a Hong Kong American martial artist, Hong Kong action film actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, filmmaker, and the founder of Jeet Kune Lee was the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time, and a pop culture icon of the 20th century. He is often credited with helping to change the way Asians were presented in American films
1942 Jimi Hendrix an American musician, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music"
1957 Caroline Kennedy an American author, attorney, and the current United States Ambassador to Japan. She is a prominent member of the Kennedy family and the only surviving child of U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. She is a niece of Senators Robert Kennedy and Ted Kennedy and older sister to John Kennedy, Jr
1960 Yulia Tymoshenko a Ukrainian politician and businesswoman. She co-led the Orange Revolution and was the first woman appointed Prime Minister of Ukraine, serving from 24 January to 8 September 2005, and again from 18 December 2007 to 4 March 2010
1960 Tim Pawlenty president and CEO of Financial Services Roundtable, a Washington, D.C.-based industry advocacy group. He was a Republican politician who served as the 39th Governor of Minnesota. He previously served in the Minnesota House of Representatives , where he was majority leader for two terms. In 2011 he entered the campaign for the Republican presidential nomination and later was a potential vice presidential nominee before serving as co-chair of Mitt Romney's campaign
1964 Roberto Mancini an Italian football manager and former player, currently in charge as head coach of Inter Milan. As a player Mancini was best known for his time at Sampdoria, where he played more than 550 matches, and helped them win the Serie A league title, four Coppe Italia and the European Cup Winners' Cup, whilst being capped 36 times by Italy. In 1997, after 15 years at Sampdoria, Mancini left the club to join Lazio where he won a further Scudetto, Cup Winners' Cup and two more Coppe Italia

Top 7 most famous people died on November 27

8 Horace the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. The rhetorician Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."
1852 Ada Lovelace an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world's first computer programmer
1940 Nicolae Iorga a Romanian historian, politician, literary critic, memoirist, poet and playwright. Co-founder of the Democratic Nationalist Party , he served as a member of Parliament, President of the Deputies' Assembly and Senate, cabinet minister and briefly as Prime Minister. A child prodigy, polymath and polyglot, Iorga produced an unusually large body of scholarly works, consecrating his international reputation as a medievalist, Byzantinist, Latinist, Slavist, art historian and philosopher of history. Holding teaching positions at the University of Bucharest, the University of Paris and several other academic institutions, Iorga was founder of the International Congress of Byzantine Studies and the Institute of South-East European Studies. His activity also included the transformation of Vălenii de Munte town into a cultural and academic center
1953 Eugene O'Neill an American playwright and Nobel laureate in Literature. His poetically titled plays were among the first to introduce into American drama techniques of realism earlier associated with Russian playwright Anton Chekhov, Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, and Swedish playwright August Strindberg. His plays were among the first to include speeches in American vernacular and involve characters on the fringes of society, where they struggle to maintain their hopes and aspirations, but ultimately slide into disillusionment and despair. Of his very few comedies, only one is well-known. Nearly all of his other plays involve some degree of tragedy and personal pessimism
1967 Léon M'ba the first Prime Minister and President of Gabon. A member of the Fang ethnic group, M'ba was born into a relatively privileged village family. After studying at a seminary, he held a number of small jobs before entering the colonial administration as a customs agent. His political activism in favor of black people worried the French administration, and as a punishment for his activities, he was issued a prison sentence after committing a minor crime that normally would have resulted in a small fine. In 1924, the administration gave M'ba a second chance and selected him to head the canton in Estuaire Province. After being accused of complicity with regards to the murder of a woman near Libreville, he was sentenced in 1931 to three years in prison and 10 years in exile. While in exile in Oubangui-Chari, he published works documenting tribal customary law of the Fang people. He was employed by local administrators, and received praise from his superiors for his work. He remained a persona non grata to Gabon until the French colonial administration finally allowed M'ba to return his native country in 1946
1978 Harvey Milk an American politician who became the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Politics and gay activism were not his early interests; he was not open about his homosexuality and did not participate in civic matters until around the age of 40, after his experiences in the counterculture of the 1960s
2011 Gary Speed a Welsh footballer and manager.