November 8 in history

November 8 events chronologically

960 Battle of Andrassos: Byzantines under Leo Phokas the Younger score a crushing victory over the Hamdanid Emir of Aleppo, Sayf al-Dawla
1278 Trần Thánh Tông, the second emperor of the Trần dynasty, decides to pass the throne to his crown prince Trần Khâm and take up the post of Retired Emperor
1519 Hernán Cortés enters Tenochtitlán and Aztec ruler Moctezuma welcomes him with a great celebration
1520 Stockholm Bloodbath begins: A successful invasion of Sweden by Danish forces results in the execution of around 100 people
1576 Eighty Years' War: Pacification of Ghent – The States General of the Netherlands meet and unite to oppose Spanish occupation
1602 The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford is opened to the public
1605 Robert Catesby, ringleader of the Gunpowder Plotters, is killed

Top 7 most famous people born on November 8

30 Nerva Roman Emperor from 96 to 98. Nerva became Emperor at the age of sixty-five, after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. Under Nero, he was a member of the imperial entourage and played a vital part in exposing the Pisonian conspiracy of 65. Later, as a loyalist to the Flavians, he attained consulships in 71 and 90 during the reigns of Vespasian and Domitian respectively
1656 Edmond Halley best known for computing the orbit of the eponymous Halley's Comet. He was the second Astronomer Royal in Britain, succeeding John Flamsteed
1847 Bram Stoker an Irish author known today for his 1897 Gothic novel, Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned
1869 Joseph Franklin Rutherford the second president of the incorporated Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. He played a primary role in the organization and doctrinal development of Jehovah's Witnesses, which emerged from the Bible Student movement established by Charles Taze Russell
1900 Margaret Mitchell an American author and journalist. One novel by Mitchell was published during her lifetime, the American Civil War-era novel, Gone with the Wind, for which she won the National Book Award for Most Distinguished Novel of 1936 and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1937. In more recent years, a collection of Mitchell's girlhood writings and a novella she wrote as a teenager, Lost Laysen, have been published. A collection of articles written by Mitchell for The Atlanta Journal was republished in book form
1946 Guus Hiddink a Dutch football manager and former player. He is the head coach of the Dutch national team, since 1 August 2014, where he replaced Louis van Gaal and to be succeeded by Danny Blind after UEFA Euro 2016. He is considered to be one of the most experienced and prominent managers of his generation and was the best-paid coach in international football in 2009. His achievements include winning the European treble with PSV Eindhoven; taking both the Netherlands and South Korea to a historic fourth place finish in the 1998 FIFA World Cup and 2002 FIFA World Cup respectively; leading Australia to their best ever finish at a World Cup at the 2006 FIFA World Cup; leading Russia to the semi-finals of Euro 2008, Russia's best performance since the breakup of the Soviet Union; and leading Chelsea to an FA Cup win against Everton in 2009. Hiddink has also previously managed Fenerbahçe, Valencia and Real Madrid
1986 Aaron Swartz an American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet hacktivist who committed suicide in the context of a prosecution that was widely believed to be overly zealous and inappropriate. Swartz was involved in the development of the web feed format RSS and the Markdown publishing format, the organization Creative Commons, the website framework web.py and the social news site, Reddit, in which he became a partner after its merger with his company, Infogami

Top 7 most famous people died on November 8

397 Martin of Tours Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. He has become one of the most familiar and recognisable Christian saints. As he was born in what is now Szombathely, Hungary, spent much of his childhood in Pavia, Italy, and lived most of his adult life in France, he is considered a spiritual bridge across Europe
1308 Duns Scotus generally considered to be one of the three most important philosopher-theologians of the High Middle Ages. Scotus has had considerable influence on both Catholic and secular thought. The doctrines for which he is best known are the "univocity of being," that existence is the most abstract concept we have, applicable to everything that exists; the formal distinction, a way of distinguishing between different aspects of the same thing; and the idea of haecceity, the property supposed to be in each individual thing that makes it an individual. Scotus also developed a complex argument for the existence of God, and argued for the Immaculate Conception of Mary
1674 John Milton an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost , written in blank verse
1890 César Franck a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life.
1953 Ivan Bunin the first Russian writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was noted for the strict artistry with which he carried on the classical Russian traditions in the writing of prose and poetry. The texture of his poems and stories, sometimes referred to as "Bunin brocade", is considered to be one of the richest in the language
1986 Vyacheslav Molotov a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin. Molotov served as Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars from 1930 to 1941, and as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1939 to 1949 and from 1953 to 1956. He served as First Deputy Premier from 1942 to 1957, when he was dismissed from the Presidium of the Central Committee by Nikita Khrushchev. He retired in 1961 after several years of obscurity
2009 Vitaly Ginzburg a Soviet and Russian theoretical physicist, astrophysicist, Nobel laureate, a member of the Soviet and Russian Academies of Sciences and one of the fathers of Soviet hydrogen bomb. He was the successor to Igor Tamm as head of the Department of Theoretical Physics of the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences , and an outspoken atheist. He was also known as supporter of the State of Israel and as person valuing his secular Jewish identity