Died in November

November 27, 8 Horace the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. The rhetorician Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."
November 6, 16 Agrippina the Younger a Roman Empress and one of the more prominent women in the Julio-Claudian dynasty. She was a great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of the Emperor Tiberius, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of the Emperor Claudius, and mother of the Emperor Nero
November 24, 62 Persius a Roman poet and satirist of Etruscan origin. In his works, poems and satires, he shows a stoic wisdom and a strong criticism for the abuses of his contemporaries. His works, which became very popular in the Middle Ages, were published after his death by his friend and mentor the stoic philosopher Lucius Annaeus Cornutus
November 29, 83 Pope Anianus of Alexandria 2nd Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. He was ordained as the successor of Saint Mark the Evangelist, and was also the first convert Mark won to Christianity in the region
November 20, 284 Numerian Roman Emperor from 282 to 284 with his older brother Carinus. They were sons of Carus, a general raised to the office of praetorian prefect under Emperor Probus in 282
November 25, 311 Pope Peter of Alexandria 17th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. He is revered as a saint by the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Roman Catholic Church
November 17, 344 Emperor Kang of Jin an emperor of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. He was a son of Emperor Ming and younger brother of Emperor Cheng. His reign was brief—only two years
November 3, 361 Constantius II Roman Emperor from 337 to 361. The second son of Constantine I and Fausta, he ascended to the throne with his brothers Constantine II and Constans upon their father's death
November 17, 375 Valentinian I Roman emperor from 364 to 375. Upon becoming emperor he made his brother Valens his co-emperor, giving him rule of the eastern provinces while Valentinian retained the west
November 8, 397 Martin of Tours Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. He has become one of the most familiar and recognisable Christian saints. As he was born in what is now Szombathely, Hungary, spent much of his childhood in Pavia, Italy, and lived most of his adult life in France, he is considered a spiritual bridge across Europe
November 26, 399 Pope Siricius the Pope from December 384 to his death in 399. He was successor to Pope Damasus I and was himself succeeded by Pope Anastasius I
November 11, 405 Arsacius of Tarsus the intruding archbishop of Constantinople from 404 up to 405, after the violent expulsion of John Chrysostom.
November 27, 450 Galla Placidia the Regent for Emperor Valentinian III from 423 until his majority in 437, and a major force in Roman politics for most of her life. She was consort to Ataulf, King of the Goths from 414 until his death in 415, and Empress consort to Constantius III from 417 until his death in 422
November 10, 461 Pope Leo I also known as Saint Leo the Great, reigned from 29 September 440 to his death in 461.
November 17, 474 Leo II (emperor) Byzantine Emperor for less than a year in 474. He was the son of Zeno and Ariadne, and maternal grandson of Leo I and Verina. As Leo's closest male relative, he was named successor upon his grandfather's death. After taking his father as colleague, he died of an unknown disease about 10 months into his reign in November, 474. It was widely rumored that he might have been poisoned by his mother Ariadne in order to bring her husband Zeno to the throne. He was indeed succeeded by his father, although his grandmother Verina took advantage of his death to conspire against Zeno
November 11, 489 Pope Peter III of Alexandria the 27th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark.
November 19, 496 Pope Gelasius I Pope from 1 March 492 to his death in 496. He was probably the third and last Bishop of Rome of North African berber origin in the Catholic Church. Gelasius was a prolific writer whose style placed him on the cusp between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Gelasius had been closely employed by his predecessor Felix III, especially in drafting papal documents. His ministry was characterized by a call for strict orthodoxy, a more assertive push for papal authority, and increasing tension between the churches in the West and the East
November 16, 498 Pope Anastasius II Pope from 24 November 496 to his death in 498. He was an important figure trying to end Acacian schism, but his efforts resulted in the Laurentian schism, which followed his death. Anastasius was born in Rome, the son of a priest, and is buried in Peter's Basilica
November 29, 521 Jacob of Serugh one of the foremost Syriac poet-theologians among the Syriac, perhaps only second in stature to Ephrem the Syrian and equal to Narsai. Where his predecessor Ephrem is known as the 'Harp of the Spirit', Jacob is the 'Flute of the Spirit'. He is best known for his prodigious corpus of more than seven-hundred verse homilies, or mêmrê , of which only 225 have thus far been edited and published
November 25, 559 Emperor Wenxuan of Northern Qi the first emperor of the Northern He was the second son of Eastern Wei's paramount general Gao Huan, and the death of his brother and Gao Huan's designated successor Gao Cheng in 549 became the regent of Eastern Wei. In 550, he forced Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei to yield the throne to him, ending Eastern Wei and starting Northern Qi
November 29, 561 Chlothar I one of the four sons of Clovis I of the Merovingian dynasty.
November 15, 565 Justinian I a Byzantine emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire
November 17, 593 Gregory of Tours a Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of Gaul. He was born Georgius Florentius, later adding the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather. He wrote in a form of late Vulgar Latin; however, it has been argued that this was a deliberate ploy to ensure his works would reach a wide audience. He is the main contemporary source for Merovingian history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum or Ten Books of Histories, better known as the Historia Francorum , a title given to it by later chroniclers, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of Martin of Tours. St Martin's tomb was a major draw in the 6th century, and Gregory's writings had the practical aspect of promoting this highly organized devotion
November 27, 602 Maurice (emperor) Byzantine Emperor from 582 to 602.
November 7, 604 Yohl Ik'nal a female ruler of the Mayan city of Palenque, ruling from 583 to 604, during the Mesoamerican Classic Period. Her name means "Heart of the Wind Place"
November 12, 607 Pope Boniface III the Pope from 19 February to his death in 607. Despite his short time as Pope he made a significant contribution to the organization of the Catholic Church
November 21, 615 Columbanus an Irish missionary notable for founding a number of monasteries on the European continent from around 590 in the Frankish and Lombard kingdoms, most notably Luxeuil Abbey in present-day France and Bobbio Abbey in present-day Italy. He is remembered as an exemplar of Irish missionary activity in early medieval Europe
November 8, 618 Pope Adeodatus I Pope from 13 November 615 to his death in 618.
November 15, 621 Malo (saint) the mid-6th century founder of Saint-Malo in Brittany, France. He is one of the seven founder saints of Brittany
November 17, 641 Emperor Jomei the 34th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
November 3, 644 Umar one of the most powerful and influential Muslim caliphs in history. He was a Sahabah or companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He succeeded Abu Bakr as the second Rashid of the Rashidun Caliphate on 23 August 634. He was an expert Islamic jurist and is best known for his pious and just nature, which earned him the title Al-Faruq. He is sometimes referred to as Umar I by historians of Islam, since a later Umayyad caliph, Umar II, also bore that name
November 24, 654 Emperor Kōtoku the 36th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
November 15, 655 Penda of Mercia today the English Midlands. A pagan at a time when Christianity was taking hold in many of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Penda took over the Severn Valley in 628 following the Battle of Cirencester before participating in the defeat of the powerful Northumbrian king Edwin at the Battle of Hatfield Chase in 633
November 15, 655 Æthelhere of East Anglia King of East Anglia from 653 or 654 until his death. Æthelhere was a member of the ruling Wuffingas dynasty and was one of three sons of Eni to rule East Anglia as Christian kings. He was a nephew of Rædwald, who was the first of the Wuffingas of which more than a name is known
November 27, 657 Clovis II succeeded his father Dagobert I in 639 as King of Neustria and Burgundy. His brother Sigebert III had been King of Austrasia since 634. He was initially under the regency of his mother Nanthild until her death in her early thirties in 642. This death allowed him to fall under the influence of the secular magnates, who reduced the royal power in their own favour. Clovis' wife, Balthild, was an Anglo-Saxon aristocrat sold into slavery in Gaul. She had been owned by Clovis' mayor of the palace, Erchinoald, who gave her to him to garner royal favour. She bore him three sons who all became kings after his death. The eldest, Chlothar, succeeded him and his second eldest, Childeric, was eventually placed on the Austrasian throne by Ebroin. The youngest, Theuderic, succeeded Childeric in Neustria and eventually became the sole king of the Franks
November 14, 669 Fujiwara no Kamatari a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician during the Asuka period. Kamatari was born to the Nakatomi clan and became the founder of the Fujiwara clan. He, along with the Mononobe clan, was a supporter of Shinto and fought the introduction of Buddhism to Japan. The Soga clan, defenders of Buddhism in the Asuka period, defeated Kamatari and the Mononobe clan and Buddhism became the dominant religion of the imperial court. Kamatari, along with Prince Naka no Ōe, later Emperor Tenji , launched the Taika Reform of 645, which centralized and strengthened the central government. Just before his death he received the honorific of Taishōkan and the surname Fujiwara from the Emperor Tenji, thus establishing the Fujiwara clan
November 14, 683 Yazid I the second Caliph of the Umayyad Caliphate. Yazid was the Caliph as appointed by his father Muawiyah I and ruled for three years from 680 CE until his death in 683 CE
November 7, 739 Willibrord a Northumbrian missionary saint, known as the "Apostle to the Frisians" in the modern Netherlands. He became the first Bishop of Utrecht and died at Echternach, Luxembourg
November 28, 741 Pope Gregory III Pope from 11 February 731 to his death in 741. His pontificate, like that of his predecessor, was disturbed by the iconoclastic controversy in the Byzantine Empire, and by the ongoing advance of the Lombards, in which he invoked the intervention of Charles Martel, although ultimately in vain. He was the last non-European Pope until the election of Pope Francis in 2013, 1,272 years later
November 3, 753 Saint Pirmin a monk, strongly influenced by Celtic Christianity and Saint Amand.
November 10, 765 Emperor Junnin the 47th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. The seventh son of Prince Toneri and a grandson of Emperor Temmu, his reign spanned the years 758 to 764
November 27, 784 Vergilius of Salzburg an Irish churchman, an early astronomer, bishop of Ossory and lster, bishop of Salzburg. He was called "the geometer"
November 8, 789 Willehad a Christian missionary and the Bishop of Bremen from 787.
November 20, 811 Li Fan (Tang dynasty) an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Xianzong.
November 29, 835 Muhammad al-Jawad the ninth of the Twelve Imams of Twelver Shi'ism. His given name was Muhammad ibn ‘Alī ibn Mūsā, and among his titles, al-Taqī and al-Jawād are the most renowned. Muhammad al-Taqī was the shortest-lived of the Twelve Imāms, dying at the age of 25
November 20, 842 Gregory of Dekapolis a 9th-century Byzantine monk, notable for his miracle-working and his travels across the Byzantine world. He is known as "the New Miracle-Worker" , and his feast day in the Eastern Orthodox Church is on November 20
November 4, 846 Joannicius the Great Venerable Saint Joannicius the Great, in original Greek Ioannikios the Great - respected Byzantine Christian saint, sage, theologian, prophet and wonderworker, the hermit of Mount Olympus , monk and abbot. One of the greatest monks of Christian East
November 13, 867 Pope Nicholas I Pope from 24 April 858 to his death in 867. He is remembered as a consolidator of papal authority and power, exerting decisive influence upon the historical development of the papacy and its position among the Christian nations of Western Europe. Nicholas I asserted that the pope should have suzerain authority over all Christians, even royalty, in matters of faith and morals
November 20, 869 Edmund the Martyr king of East Anglia from about 855 until his death.
November 17, 885 Liutgard of Saxony the wife and Queen of Louis the Younger, the Frankish King of Saxony and East Francia.