October 19 in history

October 19 events chronologically

439 The Vandals, led by King Gaiseric, take Carthage in North Africa
1216 King John of England dies at Newark-on-Trent and is succeeded by his nine-year-old son Henry
1386 The Universität Heidelberg held its first lecture, making it the oldest German university
1466 The Thirteen Years' War ends with the Second Treaty of Thorn
1469 Ferdinand II of Aragon marries Isabella I of Castile, a marriage that paves the way to the unification of Aragon and Castile into a single country, Spain
1512 Martin Luther becomes a doctor of theology (Doctor in Biblia)
1649 New Ross town, County Wexford, Ireland, surrenders to Oliver Cromwell

Top 7 most famous people born on October 19

1862 Auguste and Louis Lumière The Lumière brothers, Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas and Louis Jean , were the first filmmakers in history. They patented the cinematograph, which in contrast to Edison's "peepshow" kinetoscope allowed simultaneous viewing by multiple parties. Their first film, Sortie de l'usine Lumière de Lyon, shot in 1894, is considered the first true motion picture. Curiously, their surname, "Lumière", is French for "light"
1899 Miguel Ángel Asturias a Nobel Prize-winning Guatemalan poet-diplomat, novelist, playwright and journalist. Asturias helped establish Latin American literature's contribution to mainstream Western culture, and at the same time drew attention to the importance of indigenous cultures, especially those of his native Guatemala
1910 Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar an Indian American astrophysicist born in Lahore who, with William Fowler, was awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize for Physics for his mathematical theory of black holes, which was a key discovery that led to the currently accepted theory on the later evolutionary stages of massive stars. The Chandrasekhar limit is named after him
1931 John le Carré a British author of espionage novels. During the 1950s and the 1960s, Cornwell worked for the British intelligence services MI5 and MI6, and began writing novels under a pen name. His third novel The Spy Who Came in from the Cold became an international best-seller, and it remains one of his best-known works. Following the success of this novel, he left MI6 to become a full-time author
1945 Divine (performer) an American actor, singer and drag queen. Associated with independent filmmaker John Waters, he was a character actor, usually performing female roles in cinematic and theatrical appearances, and adopted a female drag persona for his music career; People magazine described him as the "Drag Queen of the Century"
1946 Philip Pullman a British writer. He is the author of several best-selling books, most notably the fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials and the fictionalised biography of Jesus, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ. In 2008, The Times named Pullman one of the "50 greatest British writers since 1945"
1969 Trey Parker an American actor, animator, screenwriter, director, producer, comedian, singer, and songwriter. He is best known for being the co-creator of South Park along with his creative partner and best friend Matt Stone, as well as co-writing and co-directing the 2011 musical The Book of Mormon. Parker grew up in Conifer, Colorado and was interested in film and music growing He attended the University of Colorado, Boulder following high school, where he met Stone. The two collaborated on various short films, and starred in a feature-length musical, titled Cannibal! The Musical, in 1993

Top 7 most famous people died on October 19

1216 John King of England King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216. Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom
1745 Jonathan Swift an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer , poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.
1893 Lucy Stone a prominent American orator, abolitionist, and suffragist, and a vocal advocate and organizer promoting rights for women. In 1847, Stone became the first woman from Massachusetts to earn a college degree. She spoke out for women's rights and against slavery at a time when women were discouraged and prevented from public speaking. Stone was known for using her maiden name after marriage, as the custom was for women to take their husband's surname
1936 Lu Xun the pen name of Zhou Shuren , a leading figure of modern Chinese literature. Writing in Vernacular Chinese as well as Classical Chinese, Lu Xun was a novelist, editor, translator, literary critic, essayist, and poet. In the 1930s he became the titular head of the League of Left-Wing Writers in Shanghai
1937 Ernest Rutherford a New Zealand-born British physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. Encyclopædia Britannica considers him to be the greatest experimentalist since Michael Faraday
1957 V. Gordon Childe an Australian archaeologist and philologist who specialized in the study of European prehistory. Working most of his life as an academic in the United Kingdom for the University of Edinburgh and then the Institute of Archaeology, London, he wrote many influential books and was an early proponent of culture-historical archaeology and Marxist archaeology
1961 Mihail Sadoveanu a Romanian novelist, short story writer, journalist and political figure, who twice served as acting head of state for the communist republic. One of the most prolific Romanian-language writers, he is remembered mostly for his historical and adventure novels, as well as for his nature writing. An author whose career spanned five decades, Sadoveanu was an early associate of the traditionalist magazine Sămănătorul, before becoming known as a Realist writer and an adherent to the Poporanist current represented by Viața Românească journal. His books, critically acclaimed for their vision of age-old solitude and natural abundance, are generally set in the historical region of Moldavia, building on themes from Romania's medieval and early modern history. Among them are Neamul Șoimăreștilor , Frații Jderi and Zodia Cancerului. With Venea o moară pe Siret... , Baltagul and some other works of fiction, Sadoveanu extends his fresco to contemporary history and adapts his style to the psychological novel, Naturalism and Social realism