October 2 in history

October 2 events chronologically

829 Theophilos (813–842), succeeds his father as Byzantine Emperor
1187 Siege of Jerusalem: Saladin captures Jerusalem after 88 years of Crusader rule
1263 The battle of Largs is fought between Norwegians and Scots
1470 A rebellion organised by Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick forces King Edward IV of England to flee to the Netherlands, restoring Henry VI to the throne
1535 Jacques Cartier discovers the area where Montreal is now located
1552 Conquest of Kazan by Ivan the Terrible
1780 John André, British Army officer of the American Revolutionary War, is hanged as a spy by American forces

Top 7 most famous people born on October 2

1452 Richard III of England King of England from 1483 until his death in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marks the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the subject of the play Richard III by William Shakespeare
1847 Paul von Hindenburg a Prussian-German field marshal, statesman, and politician, and served as the second President of Germany from 1925 to 1934.
1869 Mahatma Gandhi the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma —applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu in India
1904 Graham Greene an English novelist and author regarded as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene had acquired a reputation early in his own lifetime as a great writer, both of serious Catholic novels and of thrillers ; however, even though shortlisted in 1967, he was never awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Through 67 years of writings which included over 25 novels, he explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world through a Catholic perspective
1914 Jack Parsons (rocket engineer) an American rocket engineer, chemical engineer, inventor, and Thelemite occultist. Parsons was associated with the California Institute of Technology , and was one of the principal founders of both the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Aerojet Engineering Corporation. He pioneered the advancement of both liquid and solid-fuel rockets, including through inventing the first castable, composite solid rocket propellant
1951 Sting (musician) an English musician, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, activist, actor, and philanthropist. He is best known as the principal songwriter, lead singer, and bassist for the pioneering new wave rock band The Police, and for his subsequent solo career
1978 Ayumi Hamasaki a Japanese recording artist, lyricist, model, and actress. Also called "Ayu" by her fans, Hamasaki has been dubbed the "Empress of J-Pop" because of her popularity and widespread influence in Japan and throughout Asia. Born and raised in Fukuoka, she moved to Tokyo at fourteen to pursue a career in entertainment. In 1998, under the tutelage of Avex CEO Max Matsuura, she released a string of modestly selling singles that concluded with her 1999 debut album A Song for ××. The album debuted at the top of the Oricon charts and remained there for four weeks, establishing her popularity in Japan

Top 7 most famous people died on October 2

1803 Samuel Adams an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. As a politician in colonial Massachusetts, Adams was a leader of the movement that became the American Revolution, and was one of the architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped the political culture of the United States. He was a second cousin to President John Adams
1853 François Arago a French mathematician, physicist, astronomer, freemason, supporter of the carbonari and politician.
1927 Svante Arrhenius a Swedish scientist, originally a physicist, but often referred to as a chemist, and one of the founders of the science of physical chemistry. He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1903 and in 1905 became director of the Nobel Institute where he remained until his death. The Arrhenius equation, Arrhenius definition of an acid, lunar crater Arrhenius and the Arrhenius Labs at Stockholm University are named after him
1944 Benjamin Fondane a Romanian and French poet, critic and existentialist philosopher, also noted for his work in film and theater. Known from his Romanian youth as a Symbolist poet and columnist, he alternated Neoromantic and Expressionist themes with echoes from Tudor Arghezi, and dedicated several poetic cycles to the rural life of his native Moldavia. Fondane, who was of Jewish Romanian extraction and a nephew of Jewish intellectuals Elias and Moses Schwartzfeld, participated in both minority secular Jewish culture and mainstream Romanian culture. During and after World War I, he was active as a cultural critic, avant-garde promoter and, with his brother-in-law Armand Pascal, manager of the theatrical troupe Insula
1968 Marcel Duchamp associated with Dadaism and conceptual art, although not directly associated with Dada groups. Duchamp is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture. Duchamp has had an immense impact on twentieth-century and twenty first-century art. By World War I, he had rejected the work of many of his fellow artists as "retinal" art, intended only to please the eye. Instead, Duchamp wanted to put art back in the service of the mind
1973 Paavo Nurmi a Finnish middle- and long-distance runner. He was nicknamed the "Flying Finn" as he dominated distance running in the early 20th century. Nurmi set 22 official world records at distances between 1500 metres and 20 kilometres, and won a total of nine gold and three silver medals in his twelve events in the Olympic Games. At his peak, Nurmi was undefeated at distances from 800 m upwards for 121 races. Throughout his 14-year career, he remained unbeaten in cross country events and the 10,000 m
1985 Rock Hudson an American actor. Although he was widely known as a leading man in the 1950s and 1960s, notably in romantic comedies opposite Doris Day, Hudson is also recognized for dramatic roles in films such as Giant and Magnificent Obsession. In later years, he found success in television, starring in the popular mystery series McMillan & Wife and the soap opera Dynasty