Died on October 7

336 Pope Mark Pope from 18 January to 7 October 336.
643 Duke Huan of Qi a powerful Hegemon, who rose to be a major regional power from his headquarters in the State of Qi, toward the end of the early phase of the Spring and Autumn Period of ancient China, which began after the sack of the Western Zhou capital in BCE 771, and ended with his death. He is listed as one of the "Five Hegemons". His ancestral name was Jiang , clan name Lǚ ,and given name Xiǎobái
929 Charles the Simple the King of Western Francia from 898 until 922 and the King of Lotharingia from 911 until 919–23. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty
952 Emperor Suzaku the 61st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
1242 Emperor Juntoku the 84th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1210 through 1221
1259 Ezzelino III da Romano an Italian feudal lord in the March of Treviso who was a close ally of the emperor Frederick II and ruled Verona, Vicenza and Padua for almost two decades. He became infamous as a cruel tyrant though much of his sinister reputation may be due to the propaganda of his many enemies
1260 Albert I Duke of Saxony a Duke of Saxony, Angria, and Westphalia; Lord of Nordalbingia; Count of Anhalt; and Prince-elector and Archmarshal of the Holy Roman Empire. Even though his grandfather Albert the Bear had held the Saxon dukedom between 1138 and 1142, this Albert is counted as the first
1368 Lionel of Antwerp 1st Duke of Clarence the third son, but the second son to survive infancy, of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was so called because he was born at Antwerp. Prince Lionel was a true Fleming; born in Flanders of a Flemish mother and the grandson of William I, Count of Hainaut. He grew to be nearly seven feet in height and, being athletic in proportions, was a champion of whom any country might be proud
1461 Jean Poton de Xaintrailles one of the chief lieutenants of Joan of Arc. He served as master of the royal stables, as royal bailiff in Berry and as seneschal of Limousin. In 1454 he was appointed a Marshal of France. Jean Poton was a leading figure on the French side in the Hundred Years War
1468 Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta an Italian condottiero and nobleman, a member of the House of Malatesta and lord of Rimini, Fano, and Cesena from 1432. He was widely considered by his contemporaries as one of the most daring military leaders in Italy and commanded the Venetian forces in the 1465 campaign against the Ottoman Empire. He was also a poet and patron of the arts
1550 Jorge de Lencastre Duke of Coimbra a Portuguese Prince, illegitimate son of King John II of Portugal and Ana de Mendonça, a maid of Joanna la Beltraneja. He became the second Duke of Coimbra in 1509. He was also master of the Order of Santiago and administrator of the Order of Aviz from 1492 to 1550
1553 Cristóbal de Morales a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. He is generally considered to be the most influential Spanish composer before Victoria
1555 Louis of Praet a nobleman from the Low Countries and an important diplomat and statesman under the Emperor Charles V.
1571 Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg consort of Christian III from 1525 and Queen consort of Denmark and Norway. She was daughter of Duke Magnus I of Saxe-Lauenburg and Catherine, daughter of Henry IV, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Her sister Catherine was the first consort of Gustav I of Sweden
1577 George Gascoigne an English poet, soldier and unsuccessful courtier. He is considered the most important poet of the early Elizabethan era, following Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey and leading to the emergence of Philip Sidney. He was the first poet to deify Queen Elizabeth I, in effect establishing her cult as a virgin goddess married to her kingdom and subjects. His most noted works include A Discourse of the Adventures of Master FJ , an account of courtly sexual intrigue and one of the earliest English prose fictions; The Supposes, , an early translation of Ariosto and the first comedy written in English prose, which was used by Shakespeare as a source for The Taming of the Shrew; the frequently anthologised short poem "Gascoignes wodmanship" ; and "Certayne Notes of Instruction concerning the making of verse or ryme in English" , the first essay on English versification
1581 Honoré I Lord of Monaco Lord of Monaco from 22 August 1523 to 7 October 1581.
1612 Giovanni Battista Guarini an Italian poet, dramatist, and diplomat.
1620 Stanisław Żółkiewski a Polish nobleman of the Lubicz coat of arms, magnate and military commander of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, who took part in many campaigns of the Commonwealth and on its southern and eastern borders. He occupied a number of high-ranking posts in the administration of the Commonwealth, including castellan of L'viv , voivod of the Kiev Voivodeship and Great Chancellor of the Crown. From 1588 he was also a Field Crown Hetman, and in 1613 was promoted to Grand Hetman of the Crown. During his military career he won major battles against Sweden, Muscovy, the Ottoman Empire and the Tatars
1626 Paul Bril a Flemish painter principally of landscapes who spent most of his active career in Rome. His Italianate landscapes had a major influence on landscape painting in Italy and Northern Europe
1637 Victor Amadeus I Duke of Savoy the Duke of Savoy from 1630 to 1637. He was also titular King of Cyprus and Jerusalem. He was also known as the Lion of Susa
1653 Fausto Poli a Roman Catholic prelate and Cardinal.
1663 Sophia Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt Landgravine of Hesse-Darmstadt by birth and by marriage Landgravine of Hesse-Homburg.
1678 Denis Amelote Cong. Orat., , was a French Biblical writer and scholar who is notable for his French translation of the New Testament. In his translation he quoted Greek minuscule manuscripts: 42, 43, 44, and 149
1690 Jacques Savary a successful French merchant who became a widely recognised expert on questions regarding commerce. He was the author of Le parfait négociant , a manual on mercantile trade, which was translated into several languages
1708 Guru Gobind Singh the last of the ten Sikh Gurus. He was a warrior, poet and philosopher. He succeeded his father Guru Tegh Bahadur as the leader of Sikhs at the young age of nine. He contributed much to Sikhism; notable was his contribution to the continual formalisation of the faith which the first Guru Guru Nanak had founded, as a religion, in the 15th century; and his promotion of the covering of one's hair with a turban. Guru Gobind Singh, the last of the living Sikh Gurus, initiated the Sikh Khalsa in 1699, passing the Guruship of the Sikhs to the Eleventh and Eternal Sikh Guru, the Guru Granth Sahib, the sacred Book of the Sikhs
1727 Jeanne Agnès Berthelot de Pléneuf marquise de Prie a French noblewoman notable for her intriguing during the reign of Louis XV.
1754 Tanacharison an American Indian leader who played a pivotal role in the beginning of the French and Indian War. He was known to European-Americans as the Half King, a title also used to describe several other historically important American Indian leaders. His name has been spelled in a variety of ways
1759 Karl August von Bergen a German anatomist and botanist.
1772 John Woolman a North American merchant, tailor, journalist, and itinerant Quaker preacher, and an early abolitionist in the colonial era. Based in Mount Holly, New Jersey, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he traveled through frontier areas of British North America to preach Quaker beliefs, and advocate against slavery and the slave trade, cruelty to animals, economic injustices and oppression, and conscription. From 1755 during the French and Indian War, he urged tax resistance to deny support to the military. In 1772, Woolman traveled to England, where he urged Quakers to support abolition of slavery
1780 Patrick Ferguson a Scottish officer in the British Army, an early advocate of light infantry and the designer of the Ferguson rifle. He is best known for his service in the 1780 military campaign of Charles Cornwallis during the American Revolutionary War in the Carolinas, in which he aggressively recruited Loyalists and harshly treated Patriot sympathisers. Some dispute this characterization of Ferguson as showing pro-Patriot bias, however, and other accounts praise him for his humanity and unwillingness to follow orders he considered barbaric
1780 Józef Kanty Ossoliński a magnate in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Supported Stanisław Leszczyński, although abandoned him in 1733 when his cause looked worse and from 1735 he became a supporter of August III the Saxon. He became a close ally of hetman Jan Klemens Branicki and his political group, and one of the most known opponents of the familia. From 1757 he became the voivode of Wołyń and received the Order of the White Eagle. He opposed the election of Stanisław August Poniatowski, who at that time received support from the Russian Empire. Supporter of the Bar Confederation. In 1775 he resigned his voivode office and retreated from politics
1783 William Tans'ur an English hymn-writer, composer of West gallery music, and teacher of music. His output includes approximately a hundred hymn tunes and psalm settings and a Te Deum. His manual A New Musical Grammar was still popular in the nineteenth century
1787 Henry Muhlenberg a German Lutheran pastor sent to North America as a missionary, requested by Pennsylvania colonists.
1792 George Mason an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the United States Bill of Rights." For these reasons he is considered one of the "Founding Fathers" of the United States
1793 Wills Hill 1st Marquess of Downshire a British politician of the Georgian era. Best known in the United States as the Earl of Hillsborough, he served as Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1768 to 1772, a critical period leading toward the American War of Independence
1795 Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann a Swiss philosophical writer, naturalist, and physician.
1796 Thomas Reid a religiously trained Scottish philosopher, a contemporary of David Hume as well as "Hume's earliest and fiercest critic." He was the founder of the Scottish School of Common Sense and played an integral role in the Scottish Enlightenment. The early part of his life was spent in Aberdeen and he graduated from the University of Aberdeen. He began his career as a Minister of the Church of Scotland but ceased to be a Minister when he was given a professorship at King's College, Aberdeen in 1752. He obtained his doctorate and wrote An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. He and his colleagues founded the 'Aberdeen Philosophical Society' which was popularly known as the 'Wise Club'. Shortly after the publication of his first book, he was given the prestigious Professorship of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow when he was called to replace Adam Smith. He resigned from this position in 1781, after which he prepared his university lectures for publication in two books: Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man and Essays on the Active Powers of the Human Mind. Reid was buried at Blackfriars Church in the grounds of Glasgow College and when the university moved to Gilmorehill in the west of Glasgow, his tombstone was inserted in the main building. See separate article on Thomas Reid's tombstone
1835 Carlos Miguel Fitz-James Stuart 14th Duke of Alba a Spanish aristocrat.
1847 Alexandre Brongniart a French chemist, mineralogist, and zoologist, who collaborated with Georges Cuvier on a study of the geology of the region around Paris. He was the son of the architect Alexandre-Théodore Brongniart and father of the botanist Adolphe-Théodore Brongniart
1849 Edgar Allan Poe an American author, poet, editor, and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story, and is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career
1850 Karl Schorn a German painter and chess master.
1852 Charles Austen an officer in the Royal Navy. He served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and beyond, eventually rising to the rank of rear-admiral
1855 François Magendie a French physiologist, considered a pioneer of experimental physiology. He is known for describing the foramen of Magendie. There is also a Magendie sign, a downward and inward rotation of the eye due to a lesion in the cerebellum. Magendie was a faculty at the College of France, holding the Chair of Medicine from 1830 to 1855
1857 Louis McLane an American lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware, and Baltimore, Maryland. He was a veteran of the War of 1812 and a member of the Federalist Party and later the Democratic Party. He served as the U.S. Representative from Delaware, U.S. Senator from Delaware, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, U.S. Secretary of State, Minister Plenipotentiary to the United Kingdom, and President of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
1867 Mohammad Afzal Khan the Emir of Afghanistan from 1865 to 1867. The oldest son of Dost Mohammed Khan, Afzal Khan seized power from his brother Sher Ali Khan three years after their father's death. Following Afzal Khan's death the following year, Mohammad Azam Khan was reinstated as Amir of Afghanistan. He was an ethnic Pashtun and belong to the Barakzai tribe
1870 Majid bin Said of Zanzibar the first Sultan of Zanzibar. He ruled Zanzibar from October 19, 1856 to October 7, 1870
1870 Mario Mattei an Italian Cardinal, of the Roman noble House of Mattei. He became Dean of the College of Cardinals in 1860
1871 John Fox Burgoyne a British Army officer. After taking part in Siege of Malta during the French Revolutionary Wars, he saw action under Sir John Moore and then under Sir Arthur Wellesley at the numerous battles of the Peninsular War. He served under General Edward Pakenham as chief engineer during the War of 1812. He went on to act as official advisor to Lord Raglan during the Crimean War advocating the Bay of Kalamita as the point of disembarkation for allied forces and recommending a Siege of Sevastopol from the south side rather than a coup de main, so consigning the allied forces to a winter in the field in 1854
1873 Knut Jungbohn Clement a Danish linguist.
1876 Georg Heinrich Pertz a German historian born at Hanover.