Died on September 10

918 Baldwin II Count of Flanders the second Count of Flanders and ruled from 879 to 918.
1167 Empress Matilda the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when he died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies
1197 Henry II Count of Champagne count of Champagne from 1181 to 1197, and King of Jerusalem from 1192 to 1197, although he never used the title of king.
1197 Margaret of France Queen of England and Hungary was, by her two marriages, queen of England, Hungary and Croatia.
1281 John II Margrave of Brandenburg-Stendal co-ruler of Brandenburg with his brother Otto "with the arrow" from 1266 until his death. He also used the title Lord of Krossen, after a town in the Neumark
1305 Nicholas of Tolentino an Italian saint and mystic.
1308 Emperor Go-Nijō the 94th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He reigned from March 3, 1301 until September 10, 1308
1382 Louis I of Hungary King of Hungary and Croatia from 1342 and King of Poland from 1370 until his death.
1384 Joan Duchess of Brittany Penthièvre or Joan the Lame reigned as Duchess of Brittany suo jure together with her husband Charles of Blois between 1341 and 1364. Her ducal claims were contested by the House of Montfort, which prevailed only after an extensive civil war, the War of the Breton Succession. After the war, Joan remained titular title Duchess of Brittany to her death. She was Countess of Penthièvre in her own right throughout her life
1419 John the Fearless Duke of Burgundy from 1404 to 1419. For a period he was regent for his mentally ill first cousin Charles VI of France and a member of the Valois Dynasty
1454 Bolesław IV of Warsaw a Polish duke of Masovia. He inherited territories of his grandfather, Janusz I of Warsaw
1482 Federico da Montefeltro one of the most successful condottieri of the Italian Renaissance, and lord of Urbino from 1444 until his death. In Urbino he commissioned the construction of a great library, perhaps the largest of Italy after the Vatican, with his own team of scribes in his scriptorium, and assembled around him a large humanistic court in the Ducal Palace of Urbino, designed by Luciano Laurana and Francesco di Giorgio Martini
1504 Philibert II Duke of Savoy the Duke of Savoy from 1497 until his death.
1519 John Colet an English churchman and educational pioneer.
1547 Pier Luigi Farnese Duke of Parma the first Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro, from 1545 to 1547.
1549 Anthony Denny a confidant of Henry VIII of England. Denny was the most prominent member of the Privy chamber in Henry's last years having, together with his brother-in-law John Gates, charge of the "dry stamp" of Henry's signature, and attended Henry on his deathbed. He also served as Groom of the Stool. He was a member of the reformist circle that offset the conservative religious influence of Bishop Gardiner. He was a wealthy man, having acquired manors and former religious sites through the Court of augmentations. By 1548 he was keeper of Westminster Palace
1561 Takeda Nobushige a samurai of Japan's Sengoku period, and younger brother of Takeda Shingen. Takeda Nobushige held the favor of their father, and was meant to inherit the Takeda lands, wealth and power, becoming head of the clan. However, Shingen rebelled against their father and seized the lands and power for himself. Nobushige nevertheless fought alongside his brother who relied on him for support, He is famous not only for his strategic insight but also his wisdom; he wrote among other things Kyūjūkyū Kakun, a set of 99 short rules for Takeda clan members, some of which are erroneously attributed to Shingen himself from time to time. He is also known as Takeda Tenkyū
1591 Richard Grenville an English sailor who as captain of the Revenge, died at the Battle of Flores , fighting heroically against overwhelming odds, and refusing to surrender his ship to the far more numerous Spanish. He was also a soldier, an Armed Merchant Fleet Owner, Privateer, Colonizer, and explorer. He took part in the early English attempts to settle the New World, and also participated in the fight against the Spanish Armada. His non military offices included Member of Parliament for Cornwall, High Sheriff of County Cork from 1569–70 and Sheriff of Cornwall in 1576–77. He was the grandfather of Sir Bevil Grenville of English Civil War fame, whose son was John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath
1604 William Morgan (Bible translator) Bishop of Llandaff and of St Asaph, and the translator of the first version of the whole Bible into Welsh from Greek and Hebrew.
1607 Luzzasco Luzzaschi an Italian composer, organist, and teacher of the late Renaissance. He was born and died in Ferrara, and despite evidence of travels to Rome it is assumed that Luzzaschi spent the majority of his life in his native city. He was a skilled representative of the late Italian madrigal style, along with Palestrina, Wert, Monte, Lassus, Marenzio, Gesualdo and others
1641 Ambrose Barlow venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. He is one of a group of saints canonized by Pope Paul VI who became known as the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales
1669 Henrietta Maria of France queen consort of England, Scotland, and Ireland as the wife of King Charles She was mother of his two immediate successors, Charles II and James II.
1676 Gerrard Winstanley an English Protestant religious reformer and political activist during The Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. Winstanley was one of the founders of the English group known as the True Levellers or Diggers for their beliefs, and for their actions. The group occupied public lands that had been privatised by enclosures and dug them over, pulling down hedges and filling in ditches, to plant crops. True Levellers was the name they used to describe themselves, whereas the term Diggers was coined by contemporaries
1680 Baldassare Ferri an Italian castrato singer. He is said to have possessed "extraordinary endurance of breath, flexibility of voice and depth of emotion"
1684 Johann Rosenmüller a German Baroque composer, who played a part in transmitting Italian musical styles to the north.
1748 Ignacia del Espíritu Santo a Filipino Religious Sister of the Roman Catholic Church.
1749 Émilie du Châtelet a French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment. Her crowning achievement is considered to be her translation and commentary on Isaac Newton's work Principia Mathematica. The translation, published posthumously in 1759, is still considered the standard French translation
1759 Ferdinand Konščak a Jesuit missionary, explorer, and cartographer.
1764 Giovanni Antonio Giay an Italian composer. His compositional output includes 15 operas, 5 symphonies, and a significant amount of sacred music
1797 Mary Wollstonecraft an eighteenth-century English writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman , in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason
1800 Johann David Schoepff a German botanist, zoologist, and physician.
1801 Jason Fairbanks an early American murderer. Fairbanks came from a prominent family in Dedham, Massachusetts. He was the son of Ebenezer and Prudence Farrington Fairbanks and lived in the Fairbanks House, today the oldest wood-framed house in the country. He was born with a lame arm. His sixth cousin, once removed, was Vice President Charles Fairbanks
1806 Johann Christoph Adelung a German grammarian and philologist.
1806 Johann Anton Leisewitz a German lawyer and dramatic poet, and a central figure of the Sturm und Drang era. He is best known for his play Julius von Tarent , that inspired Friedrich Schiller and is considered the forerunner of Schiller's quintessential Sturm und Drang work The Robbers
1816 Manuel de Bernardo Álvarez del Casal an influential Criollo figure in New Granada at the time of the independence movement. He occupied several important positions in the rebel government. He was also the uncle of Antonio Nariño, forerunner of independence. He served as president of the rebel State of Cundinamarca in 1814
1827 Ugo Foscolo an Italian writer, revolutionary and poet.
1828 Antoine-François Andréossy a French general and diplomat of noble origin and Italian descent.
1839 James Maitland 8th Earl of Lauderdale Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland and a representative peer for Scotland in the House of Lords.
1842 Letitia Christian Tyler First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death.
1842 William Hobson the first Governor of New Zealand and co-author of the Treaty of Waitangi.
1845 Georg von Cancrin a Russian aristocrat and politician best known for spearheading reforms in the Russian financial system early in the 19th century.
1845 Joseph Story an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1845. He is most remembered for his opinions in Martin Hunter's Lessee and The Amistad case, and especially for his magisterial Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States, first published in 1833. Dominating the field in the 19th century, this work is a cornerstone of early American jurisprudence. It is the second comprehensive treatise on the provisions of the U.S. Constitution and remains a critical source of historical information about the forming of the American republic and the early struggles to define its law
1851 Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet a renowned American pioneer in the education of the deaf. Along with Laurent Clerc and Mason Cogswell, he co-founded the first institution for the education of the deaf in North America, and he became its first principal. When opened on April 15, 1817, it was called the "Connecticut Asylum for the Education and Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons," but it is now known as the American School for the Deaf
1859 Thomas Nuttall an English botanist and zoologist who lived and worked in America from 1808 until 1841.
1862 Carlos Antonio López the leader of Paraguay from 1841 to 1862.
1866 Alphonse Loubat a French inventor who developed improvements in tram and rail equipment, and helped develop tram lines in New York City and Paris.
1867 Pierre François Olive Rayer a French physician who was a native of Saint Sylvain. He made important contributions in the fields of pathological anatomy, physiology, comparative pathology and parasitology
1867 Simon Sechter an Austrian music theorist, teacher, organist, conductor and composer. He may have been the most prolific composer who ever lived, outdoing even Georg Philipp Telemann in the quantity of his output
1872 Avram Iancu a Transylvanian Romanian lawyer who played an important role in the local chapter of the Austrian Empire Revolutions of 1848–1849. He was especially active in the Țara Moților region and the Apuseni Mountains. The rallying of peasants around him, as well as the allegiance he paid to the Habsburg got him the moniker Crăișorul Munților
1883 Otto Pius Hippius a Baltic German architect, particularly noted for several buildings in present-day Estonia.