September 8 in history

September 8 events chronologically

70 Roman forces under Titus sack Jerusalem
617 Battle of Huoyi: Li Yuan defeats a Sui Dynasty army, opening the path to his capture of the imperial capital Chang'an and the eventual establishment of the Tang Dynasty
1100 Election of Antipope Theodoric
1253 Pope Innocent IV canonised Stanisław of Szczepanów, killed by king Bolesław II
1264 The Statute of Kalisz, guaranteeing Jews safety and personal liberties and giving battei din jurisdiction over Jewish matters, is promulgated by Boleslaus the Pious, Duke of Greater Poland
1271 John XXI chosen as Pope
1331 Stephen Uroš IV Dušan declares himself king of Serbia

Top 7 most famous people born on September 8

1157 Richard I of England King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy , Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Count of Nantes, and Overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior. The Muslims called him Melek-Ric or Malek al-Inkitar. He was also known in Occitan as Oc e No , because of his reputation for terseness
1830 Frédéric Mistral a French writer and lexicographer of the Occitan language. Mistral received the 1904 Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of the fresh originality and true inspiration of his poetic production, which faithfully reflects the natural scenery and native spirit of his people, and, in addition, his significant work as a Provençal philologist". He was a founding member of Félibrige and a member of l'Académie de Marseille
1841 Antonín Dvořák a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed aspects, specifically rhythms, of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. Dvořák's own style has been described as 'the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them'
1922 Lyndon LaRouche a controversial American political activist and founder of the LaRouche movement. He has written on economic, scientific, and political topics, as well as on history, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. LaRouche was a presidential candidate in each election from 1976 to 2004, running once for his own U.S. Labor Party and seven times for the Democratic Party nomination
1925 Peter Sellers a British film actor, comedian and singer. He performed in the BBC Radio comedy series The Goon Show, featured on a number of hit comic songs and became known to a world-wide audience through his many film characterisations, among them Chief Inspector Clouseau in The Pink Panther series of films
1969 Gary Speed a Welsh footballer and manager.
1979 Pink (singer) an American singer, songwriter, and actress. Originally a member of the girl group Choice, she rose to fame as an R&B artist with her debut solo album, Can't Take Me Home. The album was certified double platinum in the United States and spawned two Billboard Hot 100 top-ten hits, "There You Go" and "Most Girls". She gained further recognition with Moulin Rouge! soundtrack "Lady Marmalade", which gave Pink her first Grammy Award as well as her first number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100. Pink took more artistic control and pursued pop rock direction for her second album, Missundaztood. It sold more than 13 million copies worldwide and yielded three U.S. top-ten singles, "Get the Party Started", "Don't Let Me Get Me", and "Just Like a Pill"

Top 7 most famous people died on September 8

701 Pope Sergius I Pope from 15 December 687 to his death in 701. He was elected at a time when two rivals, the archdeacon Paschal and the archpriest Theodore, and their supporters were locked in dispute about which of them should become pope
1645 Francisco de Quevedo a Spanish nobleman, politician and writer of the Baroque era. Along with his lifelong rival, Luis de Góngora, Quevedo was one of the most prominent Spanish poets of the age. His style is characterized by what was called conceptismo. This style existed in stark contrast to Góngora's culteranismo
1894 Hermann von Helmholtz a German physician and physicist who made significant contributions to several widely varied areas of modern science. In physiology and psychology, he is known for his mathematics of the eye, theories of vision, ideas on the visual perception of space, color vision research, and on the sensation of tone, perception of sound, and empiricism. In physics, he is known for his theories on the conservation of energy, work in electrodynamics, chemical thermodynamics, and on a mechanical foundation of thermodynamics. As a philosopher, he is known for his philosophy of science, ideas on the relation between the laws of perception and the laws of nature, the science of aesthetics, and ideas on the civilizing power of science. The largest German association of research institutions, the Helmholtz Association, is named after him
1949 Richard Strauss a leading German composer of the late Romantic and early modern eras. He is known for his operas, which include Der Rosenkavalier and Salome; his lieder, especially his Four Last Songs; and his tone poems Death and Transfiguration, Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Also sprach Zarathustra, An Alpine Symphony, and other orchestral works, such as Metamorphosen. Strauss was also a prominent conductor throughout Germany and Austria
1981 Hideki Yukawa a Japanese theoretical physicist and the first Japanese Nobel laureate.
2003 Leni Riefenstahl a German film director, producer, screenwriter, editor, photographer, actress and dancer widely known for directing the Nazi propaganda film Triumph of the Will. Riefenstahl’s prominence in the Third Reich, along with her personal association with Adolf Hitler, destroyed her film career following Germany's defeat in World War II, after which she was arrested but released without any charges
2012 Thomas Szasz a psychiatrist and academic, a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a member of the American Psychoanalytic Association, a professor of psychiatry at the State University of New York, and starting in 1990, he was professor emeritus of psychiatry at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. He was well known as a social critic of the moral and scientific foundations of psychiatry, of what he saw as social control aims of medicine in modern society, and scientism. His books The Myth of Mental Illness and The Manufacture of Madness set out some of the arguments most associated with him